Thursday, January 10, 2013

Asheville City Market Moves Indoors This Winter


Last winter, Asheville City Market experimented with hosting an indoor winter market at its south location. The result? Fanfare. Shoppers loved being able to support local farmers and artisan food producers even during the coldest of months. In fact, it was so well received that Asheville City Market South will operate an indoor winter market again this year, and Asheville City Market downtown will move indoors for the first time as well.


“We are thrilled that shoppers want both Asheville City Markets to continue during the winter,” says Market Manager Mike McCreary. “We’re in awe of and thankful to our farmer, artisan food producer and craft vendors who continue to grow and create in the winter and don’t want to skip a beat. We’re also thankful to hosts Biltmore Park Town Square and Haywood Park Hotel.”

McCreary expects around 17 vendors at Asheville City Market South—which moves indoors to 28 Schenck Parkway at Biltmore Park Town Square (the lobby of Western Carolina University’s satellite campus)—and about 35 vendors at Asheville City Market in downtown—which moves indoors to the atrium of Haywood Park Hotel at 1 Battery Park Avenue. Asheville City Market South begins January 9 and runs Wednesdays through March, 11 am-3 pm; Asheville City Market in downtown begins January 12 and runs Saturdays through March, 10 am-1 pm. Vendors will offer cold-weather and greenhouse grown produce, baked goods, home goods and more.

But Asheville City Market isn’t alone in staying open during what was once the “off season.” In fact, more winter markets will operate in Western North Carolina this year than ever before.

“Area farmers are extremely innovative when it comes to season extension,” says Bridget Kennedy, Local Food Campaign director for ASAP. “What’s more, there is increasing demand for local food and a desire to not only enjoy it year-round but continue the direct involvement with producers that farmers tailgate markets allow. The winter market trend looks like it will continue, in our region and beyond.”

In the Asheville-area, the Neighborhood Y at Woodfin Reynolds Mountain Winter Tailgate Market—entering its second year—kicks off the winter market season on January 5 from 10 am to 12:30 pm. Find a list of more winter markets, including tailgates in Haywood, Jackson, Madison and Mitchell counties, below.

For weekly winter market reports, visit ASAP’s community website fromhere.org. Find a complete list of area tailgate markets with ASAP’s online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org

2013 Winter Farmers Markets*

·  Asheville City Market: January 12-March 30, Saturdays 10 am-1 pm at the Haywood Park Hotel atrium.
·  Asheville City Market South: January 9-March 27, Wednesdays 11 am-3 pm at 28 Schenck Parkway in Biltmore Park Town Square (lobby of WCU’s satellite campus).
·  Bakersville Farmers Market: December-May, 2nd Saturdays 10 am-2 pm at the Historic Courthouse.
·  Haywood’s Historic Farmers Market: January-March, Saturdays 9 am-noon at the HART Theater parking lot in Waynesville. Note: This is not a full market. The market’s regular seafood vendor will stay to provide seafood during the winter when available and may be joined by value-added producers. Stay tuned to the market’s Facebook page for updates.
·  Jackson County Farmers Market: January 5-spring, Saturdays 10 am-1 pm at the Community Table on Central Street.
·  Madison County Indoor Winter Market: January-March, 2nd and 4th Saturdays 10 am-2 pm at Madison County Cooperative Extension.
·  Neighborhood Y at Woodfin Reynolds Mountain Winter Tailgate: January 5-spring, Saturdays 10 am-12:30 pm at the LOFTS at Reynolds Village, Building 51.
·  Spruce Pine Farmers Market: January-April, 3rd Saturdays 2-6 pm at Mountainside Wine. 
*Note: This information is compiled by ASAP; details subject to change. Check with individual markets for specifics.

ABOUT ASAP (APPALACHIAN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE PROJECT)
ASAP’s mission is to help local farms thrive, link farmers to markets and supporters, and build healthy communities through connections to local food. To learn more about ASAP’s work, visit asapconnections.org, or call (828) 236-1282.

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